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Our 10 Favorite Nonprofit Blog Posts of 2015

Changing the world takes grit, strength, and the ability to stand tall in order to affect change; often times when you’re standing alone. See3 knows this, and we want to thank all of our clients and friends in the nonprofit and social cause sectors who work tirelessly to make our world a better place.

Over the year, we’ve read your blogs, reports and accounts of what your job entails, and often times, we part feeling a bit knowledgeable and re-impassioned to continue fighting the good fight alongside you and your teams. No doubt, there are thousands of nonprofits and trailblazers who deserve recognition, and for your months of hard work, there are hundreds of thousands of blog posts to accompany it.

And so we set out to do the impossible: narrow down 10 of our favorite nonprofit blog posts from 2015 that informed, motivated, delighted or enlightened us.

Cheers to all the do-goodery you’ve done!

 

1. "Making Childbirth Safer: It Takes a Sales Force"

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(Photo: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation)

Date: January 12, 2015

Nonprofit: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Why we love it: The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation launched its BetterBirth program to help mitigate the devastating maternal and infant mortality rates that plague India. In this post, we learn about the foundational steps that female health workers and peer educators of the program are taking and how the nuanced cultural and workplace belief systems play a part in literal life or death.

 


2. "Nearly 15 Years Later, Alexander’s Wish Still Impacts His Life"

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(Photo: Make-A-Wish Foundation)

Date: March 25, 2015

Nonprofit: Make-A-Wish Foundation

Why we love it: Alexander first began working with to Make-A-Wish as a child with leukemia who had dreams of collecting insects from a real, tropical rainforest, and so, the organization took him to Panama, where he became the youngest person to operate the Panama Canal. Now, some 15 years later, Alexander is not only a leukemia survivor, he has gone on to graduate from college and according to his mother, Lisa, he is living his dream on Barro Colorado Island in Panama doing research with the entomologist who was a big part of his wish. We love reading stories like this because it reminds us of just how much we can impact someone’s life through a wish, a donation, and a story.

 


3. “From the Fields to Congress: Latinos are Environmental Champions

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(Photo: League of Conservation Voters)

Date: April 1, 2015

Nonprofit: League of Conservation Voters

Why we love it: Latinos are demanding change to the farms, environments and the communities in which they live, and they’re turning to their leaders in Congress to make that change happen. This blog post by the organization’s National Director of Latino Outreach, Jennifer Allen, brings to light just how the Senate and the House voted on important environmental legislation that not only impacts the US, but more specifically Latino Communities. (See the results of the 2014 National Environmental Scorecard here.)

 


4. "The innovation racket"

 

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(Photo: International Rescue Committee)

Date: May 26, 2015

Nonprofit: International Rescue Committee

Why we love it: How we get so caught up on using words like “innovation” that we seldom spend time thinking through what that really means as far as getting local, on the ground results. In this refreshingly honest post, Emmanuel d'Harcourt, senior health director at International Rescue Committee recalls lessons from history on innovativation and what questions nonprofit professionals can ask themselves before talking or writing about innovation, because sometimes what’s innovative in solving one epidemic is a simple as phone credits so that you use your mobile device to access the latest information.

 


5. "California's Water Crisis Is The Result Of Market Failure As Much As Drought"

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(Photo: Fast Co Exist)

Date: June 2, 2015

Nonprofit: Ceres

Why we love it: Who would have thought that water — a commodity that’s a dire necessary to our very survival would be part of investment portfolios? In this blog post that was originally contributed to Fast Co Exist, Brooke Barton, Ceres’ senior water program director talks about companies that are trying to understand how localized water risks affect their investment in utility bonds and just how the California water crisis came to be. Barton points out key factors that have contributed to the water crisis and even suggests that there’s room for venture capitals to back water-related solutions.

 


6. "More People Power: 14 Human Rights Successes So Far in 2015"

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(Photo: Amnesty International)

Date: July 6, 2015

Nonprofit: Amnesty International

Why we love it: When you’re in the throws of do-goodery, it is oftentimes hard to take stock of the small wins along the way. Amnesty International put together a list of 14 global human rights successes to provide hope to those supporting the fights to end travesties, which included marriage equality, a pardoning in Nigeria, segregation and much more.  

 


7. "10 Years After Katrina: We’re in a Race Against Time"

 

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(Photo: Environmental Deferense Fund)

Date: August 26, 2015

Nonprofit: Environmental Defense Fund

Why we love it: Natalie Pey­ron­nin, the director of science policy for the Mississippi River Delta Restoration program at EDF, gives a sombering detail of the time she spent cleaning up after Hurricane Katrina hit Louisiana more than 10 years ago. While signs point to progress, companies, agencies and nonprofits are working to ensure that a tragedy like this never happens again, and that starts with finding solutions to protect Louisiana’s coastal wetlands which are still at-risk of depletion.

 


8. "When Myths Go Viral: Reclaiming humanity online to make #RefugeesWelcome"

 

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(Photo: Oxfam)

Date: September 29,2015

Nonprofit: Oxfam

Why we love it: Kate Willis, who runs social media for Oxfam, stepped from behind the curtain to dispel some mistruths about the Syrian refugee crisis with the hopes of turning apathy into real life change and compassion for those who are experiencing the greatest need. This authentic blog posts reminds us that we’re human first, professionals second, and when we see misconceptions being spread, it is our duty to inform people with facts so that they feel empowered to take a stand or perform an action.

 


9. “The Coming Out Process

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(Photo: Keshet)

Date: November 20, 2015

Nonprofit: Charles and Lynn Schusterman Foundation

Why we love it: In this post by one of its grantees, Rabbi Micah Buck Yael, The Charles and Lynn Schusterman Foundation lends its platform to allow for the rabbi to give an honest account about gender identity and religion and how the struggle to reconcile the two lead to years of anxiety and fear before walking in a truth that was void of the things that were once feared to be “worst case scenarios.”

 


10. "You Have the Power to Change A Life Just The Way You Are"

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(Photo: HuffingtonPost)

Nonprofit: Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption

Date: November 24, 2015

Why we love it: Madeleine Melcher is an adoptee, an author, and a mother who was adopted when she was 14-months-old. In this poignant call-to-action for the Dave Thomas Foundation, Melcher implores people considering adoption to remember that they are just enough of everything to provide a safe, warm and loving home for some child –namely one of the more than 100,000 children in the system now. It’s a beautiful read, and a calming reminder that we’re never too small (or unprepared) to change a life.

 

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